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Tonight: The Greatest Day in Stock Market History Investment Summit

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Amber Alert issued for 16-year-old from Laredo

An Amber Alert has been issued for a 16-year-old from Laredo.

Ashley Fernandez is 4-foot-11-inches tall, has blonde hair, brown eyes and wearing brown glasses.

Laredo police are searching for Arturo Medrano-Limas in connection with her abduction.

The suspect drives a gray 2005 Ford Focus ZX4 with TX license plate number 38L0034.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police immediately.

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200K Californians Evacuated Amid Flood Dangers

Nearly 200,000 people remained under evacuation orders Monday as California authorities try to fix erosion of the emergency spillway at the nation’s tallest dam that could unleash uncontrolled flood waters if it fails.

About 150 miles northeast of San Francisco, Lake Oroville – one of California’s largest man-made lakes – had water levels so high that an emergency spillway was used Saturday for the first time in almost 50 years.

The evacuation was ordered Sunday afternoon after engineers spotted a hole on the concrete lip of the secondary spillway for the 770-foot-tall Oroville Dam and told authorities that it could fail within the hour.

“I’m just shocked,” said Greg Levias, who was evacuating with his wife, Kaysi, two boys and a dog.

What they couldn’t fit in their trunk they piled as high as they could in their downstairs Yuba City apartment and joined the line of traffic attempting to leave the city where they had moved just three weeks ago.

Panicked and angry residents sat in bumper-to-bumper traffic hours after the evacuation order was given.

Raj Gill was managing a Shell station where anxious motorists got gas and snacks while waiting for gridlocked traffic to clear. His boss told him to close the station and flee himself, but he stayed open to feed a steady line of customers.

“You can’t even move,” he said. “I’m trying to get out of here too. I’m worried about the flooding. I’ve seen the pictures – that’s a lot of water.”

A Red Cross spokeswoman said more than 500 people were at an evacuation center in Chino, California. The shelter had run out of blankets and cots, and a semi-tractor trailer with 1,000 more cots was stuck in the gridlock of traffic fleeing the potential flooding, said Red Cross shelter manager Pam Deditch.

A California Highway Patrol spokesman said they would have two planes out Monday to help with traffic control as well as search and rescue.

State Fire and Rescue Chief Kim Zagaris said at least 250 law enforcement officers from throughout the state are in the area or on their way to help with the evacuation.

Late Sunday, officials said the evacuation orders remained in place despite the fact water was no longer spilling over the eroded area.

“There is still a lot of unknowns,” Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said at a news conference. “We need to continue to lower the lake levels and we need to give the Department of Water Resources time to fully evaluate the situation so we can make the decision to whether or not it is safe to repopulate the area.”

About 188,000 residents of Yuba, Sutter and Butte counties were ordered to evacuate.

Acting Director Department of Water Resources Bill Croyle said officials will be able to assess the damage to the emergency spillway now that the lake levels have been lowered.

The erosion at the head of the emergency spillway threatens to undermine the concrete weir and allow large, uncontrolled releases of water from Lake Oroville. Those potential flows could overwhelm the Feather River and other downstream waterways, channels and levees and flood towns in three counties.

Oroville Lake levels had decreased by Sunday night as they let water flow from its heavily damaged main spillway.

Croyle said the department will continue releasing as much as 100,000 cubic feet per second from the main spillway to try and reduce the dam’s level by 50 feet ahead of storms forecast to reach the area Wednesday.

Department engineer and spokesman Kevin Dossey told the Sacramento Bee the emergency spillway was rated to handle 250,000 cubic feet per second, but it began to show weakness Sunday after flows peaked at 12,600 cubic feet per second.

Honea said there was a plan to plug the hole by using helicopters to drop rocks into the crevasse. But Croyle said at that no repair work was done after officials looked at the flow and available resources.

Gov. Jerry Brown late Sunday issued an emergency order to fortify authorities’ response to the emergency at the dam and help with evacuations.

Adjutant General David S. Baldwin of the California National Guard said at a news conference late Sunday that eight helicopters will be available Monday to assist with emergency spillway reconstruction.

The California National Guard put out a notification to all 23,000 soldiers and airmen to be ready to deploy if needed, he said. Baldwin says an alert for the entire California National Guard hadn’t been issued since the 1992 riots.

Earlier Sunday, officials stressed the Oroville Dam itself was structurally sound.

Unexpected erosion chewed through the main spillway during heavy rain earlier this week, sending chunks of concrete flying and creating a 200-foot-long, 30-foot-deep hole that continues growing. Engineers don’t know what caused the cave-in, but Chris Orrock, a Department of Water Resources spokesman, said it appears the dam’s main spillway has stopped crumbling even though it’s being used for water releases.

The lake is a central piece of California’s government-run water delivery network, supplying water for agriculture in the Central Valley and residents and businesses in Southern California.

Source: AP

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ISIS Now Has Access to Drones

Faced with a diminishing number of fighters, the Islamic State group is relying on retrofitted commercial drones to guide suicide car bombers to their targets and to launch small-scale airstrikes on Iraqi forces.

The extremist group is spending freely on drone technology as it faces pressure from coalition forces, hacking store-bought machines, applying rigorous testing protocols and mimicking tactics used by U.S. unmanned aircraft.

In all, a half-dozen storehouses IS used to make and modify drones have been found recently in Mosul, Iraqi military officials said.

The Associated Press this week visited the largest drone workshop uncovered so far, a warehouse in the Shura neighborhood. Scattered among stacks of paper were pieces of Styrofoam wings, fins and radio transmitters piled in the corners of the factory.

Most of the completed drones were destroyed by IS fighters as they retreated, Iraqi officers at the warehouse said. Spreadsheets the fighters left behind showed purchases totaling thousands of dollars a month for drone equipment.

One receipt dated a few months before the operation to reclaim Mosul began recorded the purchase of wires, silicon, electrical plugs, cables, rotors and GoPro cameras. Handwritten notes instructed IS drone operators to write daily “mission reports” and monthly reports “about the challenges and difficulties you face as well.”

All the accounts were headed “board of development and military manufacturing,” some sub-headed “air observation division.”

A cache of documents also obtained this month in a smaller makeshift factory by a researcher in Mosul indicates that the group is testing small drones – normally used as playthings – with deadly intent.

The researcher, Vera Mironova, said the drone paperwork she discovered signals a program for having machines make up for a shortage in manpower. The documents included part lists in English and Arabic. One file, marked “Tool Kit,” contained a checklist of several dozen essentials: GoPro and chargers; battery cable; laptop; explosives; and devices made up Items 1-5.

Mironova, a labor economist by training and a fellow at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, said the use of drones to both drop explosives and to direct more deadly payloads was an adaptation to the decrease in the number of attackers available.

Early in the Mosul fighting, she said, suicide bombers tended to be deployed haphazardly more to terrorize than to kill. But it didn’t take long before IS needed a new approach.

Iraqi security forces report seeing IS surveillance drones as early as 2015 in the fight for Ramadi in Iraq’s western Anbar province.

The first hints of the expanded tactics came in early 2016, when Turkish forces in northern Iraq saw toy-like drones overhead. Within 15 minutes of the sighting, they were attacked by accurate incoming fire, according to Jonathan Schroden, director of the Center for Stability and Development at the Center for Naval Analyses.

“From there, it was pretty clear where that was headed,” Schroden said. “They will look to continue to mimic what the U.S. and Western militaries have done with drones. They would look to integrate the kill chain.”

With Mosul’s streets filled with debris, the drones can serve as a way for their operators to direct people on the ground – including suicide attackers – to an open path to bloodshed. The planes loaded with explosives do less actual damage, but can sow panic among troops fighting the extremists.

“First they come to observe and then they will return carrying bombs,” Maj. Firas Mehdi said, cautioning AP journalists who were traveling with the special forces unit in December to remain under cover.

Mehdi himself had been hit with shrapnel in his leg when a drone dropped a small bomb on his position a week earlier. A small, black rotary drone flew over their position from the IS-held neighborhood just a few hundred meters away.

Two Iraqi special forces soldiers rushed Mehdi into a concrete house for cover while half a dozen more spread out into the street and fired wildly into the air.

An Iraqi special forces officer told the AP this week that at least three Iraqi troops had been killed by the drones and dozens injured.

Iraqi special forces Brig Gen Haider Fadhil said in addition to conducting surveillance and dropping bombs, the drones were being used to guide car bombs in real time.

“They were giving instructions by radio to the suicide driver and following his progress” by video feed.

The little fixed-wing planes and choppers have appeared in several IS videos online, showing the drones observing Iraqi troop movements from the air and suicide car bombs hitting their targets.

An Iraqi intelligence officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak to journalists, said he believes most of the drone parts were being purchased in Turkey and smuggled into Iraq through Syria, while others were largely made from scratch.

“Some of the designs are so simple, there’s very little technical difficulty,” he said.

Source: AP

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Trump Travel Ban Causes Chaos

President Donald Trump’s immigration order sowed more chaos and outrage across the country Sunday, with travelers detained at airports, panicked families searching for relatives and protesters registering opposition to the sweeping measure that was blocked by several federal courts.

Attorneys struggled to determine how many people were affected by the rules, which Trump said Saturday were “working out very nicely.”

But critics described widespread confusion, with travelers being held in legal limbo because of ill-defined procedures. Some lawyers manned tables at New York’s Kennedy Airport to offer help to families with detained relatives.

“We just simply don’t know how many people there are and where they are,” said Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Immigrants’ Rights Project.

Advocates for travelers say they did not have clear picture about what’s happening and that the chaos is likely to continue. The executive director of National Immigration Law Center, Marielena Hincapie, said “this is just the beginning.”

“We’re really in a crisis mode, a constitutional crisis mode in our country, and we’re going to need everyone,” she said. “This is definitely one of those all-hands-on-deck moments.”

Protests were planned or underway Sunday, including one in suburban Chicago organized by Jewish groups to show support for Muslims, as well as at Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., and Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

A federal judge in New York issued an order Saturday temporarily blocking the government from deporting people with valid visas who arrived after Trump’s travel ban took effect. But confusion remained about who could stay and who will be kept out of the country in the coming weeks. Federal courts in Virginia, Massachusetts and Washington state took similar action.

Michigan’s civil rights chief, Agustin Arbulu, condemned Trump’s order, saying he hoped the federal court ruling would lead him to narrow its scope.

“During this time of uncertainty and confusion, we urge everyone to act with restraint and not in ways that foster fear and division,” Arbulu said.

Criticism also continued abroad.

The European Union’s foreign policy chief, EU High Representative Federica Mogherini, lashed out at Trump on Sunday, insisting that instead of building walls, the continent will “celebrate” every wall which is torn down and “every new bridge that is built up.”

Among those caught in limbo: Iraqis who had been promised a life in America because of their service to the U.S. military, frail and elderly travelers from Iran and Yemen, and longtime U.S. residents traveling abroad who don’t know if they will be allowed to return home.

“What’s next? What’s going to happen next?” asked Mohammed al Rawi, an Iraqi-born American citizen in the Los Angeles area, after his 69-year-old father, coming to visit his grandchildren in California, was abruptly detained and sent back to Iraq after 12 hours in custody. “Are they going to create camps for Muslims and put us in it?”

On Saturday, large protests erupted at airports throughout the country where travelers were being held, a day after Trump signed the order banning travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia or Yemen. Trump also suspended the U.S. refugee program for four months.

An official with the Department of Homeland Security who briefed reporters by phone said 109 people who were in transit on airplanes had been denied entry and 173 had not been allowed to get on their planes overseas.

No green-card holders had ultimately been prevented from entering the U.S. as of Saturday, the official said, though several spent long hours in detention before being allowed in. Abdollah Mostafavi, 80, was released six hours after his flight arrived in San Francisco from Frankfurt.

“I’m so happy he’s finally out. He says he’s very tired,” said his daughter Mozhgan Mostafavi, holding back tears and speaking Farsi with her father.

Hameed Khalid Darweesh, a translator and assistant for the U.S. military in Iraq for 10 years now fleeing death threats, was among at least a dozen people detained at Kennedy Airport.

He walked free after his lawyers, two members of Congress and as many as 2,000 demonstrators went to the airport to seek his release.

“This is the soul of America,” Darweesh told reporters after gaining his freedom, adding that the U.S. was home to “the greatest people in the world.”

After an appeal from civil liberties lawyers, U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly issued an emergency order Saturday barring the U.S. from summarily deporting people who arrived with valid visas or an approved refugee application, saying it would likely violate their legal rights.

Staff at U.S. agencies that resettle refugees were scrambling to analyze the situation. They girded for wrenching phone calls that would have to be made to the thousands of refugees just days away from traveling to the U.S. Donnelly’s order did nothing to help those people gain entry.

Several staff members burst into tears as they contemplated the future for people who had waited years to come into the country.

“It’s complete chaos,” said Melanie Nezer, policy director for HIAS, one of nine refugee resettlement agencies that work with the U.S. State Department.

Before Trump signed the order, more than 67,000 refugees had been approved by the federal government to enter the U.S., said Jen Smyers, refugee policy director for Church World Service. More than 6,400 had already been booked on flights, including 15 families that had been expected over the next few weeks in the Chicago area from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Iran, Syria and Uganda.

The bulk of refugees entering the U.S. are settled by religious groups, which organize churches, synagogues and mosques to collect furniture, clothes and toys for the refugees and set up volunteer schedules for hosting duties. All that work ground to a halt after Trump signed the order.

Nour Ulayyet of Valparaiso, Indiana, said her sister, a Syrian living in Saudi Arabia, was sent back after arriving Saturday from Riyadh at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport. She was told she couldn’t enter the U.S. to help care for their sick mother. Ulayyet said some officials at the airport were apologizing to her sister, who had a valid visa.

Her mother, Ulayyet said, was “already having pain enough to go through.”

Source: AP

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2017 Presidential Inauguration LIVE

US President-elect Donald Trump is set to be sworn into office at the 2017 inauguration ceremony, officially becoming America’s 45th president.

 




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Trump’s Son-In-Law to Take Top White House Role

President-elect Donald Trump appointed his influential son-in-law Jared Kushner as a White House senior adviser Monday, putting the young real estate executive in position to exert broad sway over both domestic and foreign policy, particularly Middle East issues and trade negotiations.

Trump has come to rely heavily on Kushner, who is married to the president-elect’s daughter Ivanka. Since the election, the political novice has been one of the transition team’s main liaisons to foreign governments, communicating with Israeli officials and meeting Sunday with Britain’s foreign minister. He’s also huddled with congressional leaders and helped interview Cabinet candidates.

Ivanka Trump, who also played a significant role advising her father during the presidential campaign, will not be taking a formal White House position. Transition officials said the mother of three young children wanted to focus on moving her family from New York to Washington.

Kushner’s own eligibility for the White House could be challenged, given a 1967 law meant to bar government officials from hiring relatives. Kushner lawyer Jamie Gorelick argued Monday that the law does not apply to the West Wing. She cited a later congressional measure to allow the president “unfettered” and “sweeping” authority in hiring staff.

In a statement, Trump said Kushner will be an “invaluable member of my team as I set and execute an ambitious agenda.”

Kushner will resign as CEO of his family’s real estate company and as publisher of the New York Observer. He will also divest “substantial assets,” Gorelick said. The lawyer said Kushner would not be taking a salary. Ivanka Trump will also be leaving her executive roles at the Trump Organization – her father’s real estate company – and her own fashion brands.

Kushner, who turns 36 on Tuesday, emerged as one of Trump’s most powerful campaign advisers during his father-in-law’s often unorthodox presidential bid – a calming presence in an otherwise chaotic campaign. Soft-spoken and press-shy, he was deeply involved in the campaign’s digital efforts and was usually at Trump’s side during the election’s closing weeks.

He has continued to be a commanding presence during the transition, working alongside incoming White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and senior adviser Steve Bannon. He’s played a key role in coordinating Trump’s contacts with foreign leaders and has been talking with foreign government officials himself, according to a person with knowledge of the conversations.

Last week, Kushner and Bannon – the controversial conservative media executive – met with British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson.

Kushner and Bannon have also worked closely on issues related to Israel, including discussions over moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, which could inflame tensions in the Middle East, and on the Trump administration’s response to a United Nations Security Council measure condemning Israeli settlements.

Kushner is also weighing in on domestic policy. He joined other Trump advisers Monday night for a meeting with House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., on tax reform. He championed the pick of his friend Gary Cohn, the president of Goldman Sachs, for a top White House economic post, and Cohn’s influence within Trump’s team is said to be growing. He’s been a conduit between Trump’s team and the private sector, a role transition officials said would continue in the White House.

Those with knowledge of Kushner’s role spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss internal matters.

The anti-nepotism law had appeared to be the main obstacle to Kushner joining the White House. In arguing that the measure did not apply to the West Wing, Gorelick cited an opinion from two federal court judges in a 1993 case involving Hillary Clinton’s work on her husband’s health care law. She said Trump planned to seek an advisory opinion on the nepotism law from the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel.

Gorelick worked in the Clinton administration at both the Pentagon and Justice Department.

Norman Eisen, who served as President Barack Obama’s government ethics lawyer, said there is a “murky legal landscape” regarding the anti-nepotism law. But he said Kushner appeared to be taking the proper steps regarding the ethics and disclosure requirements for federal employees.

Like his father-in-law, Kushner pushed a mid-sized real estate company into the high-stakes battlefield of Manhattan. Though he is often viewed as more moderate than Trump, people close to him say he fully bought into the Trump campaign’s fiery populist message that resonated with white, working-class voters. He never publicly distanced himself from Trump’s more provocative stances, including the candidate’s call for a Muslim-immigration ban and his doubts about President Barack Obama’s birthplace.

Kushner’s place in Trump’s orbit – vital but often discreet – was vividly on display last month, when the president-elect toured the Carrier plant in Indiana to tout the jobs he says he saved.

Trump marched around the plant with Vice President-elect Mike Pence, shaking hands with workers, posing for photos and flashing his thumbs-up to the traveling press. Kushner stayed away from the cameras, lingering a deferential 10 or 20 feet from Trump while marveling at the scene.

“Look at these people,” Kushner was overheard saying as he watched dozens of workers cheer. “This is why he won.”

Source: AP

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BREAKING: Manhunt for Cop Killer Underway in Orlando

An Orlando police sergeant was shot and killed Monday after approaching a suspect wanted for questioning in the murder of his pregnant ex-girlfriend.

A second law enforcement officer was killed in a motorcycle crash while responding to a massive manhunt for the suspect.

More than a dozen schools were placed in lockdown during the manhunt, and authorities were offering a $60,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of Markeith Loyd, the 41-year-old suspect wanted in the killing of Master Sgt. Debra Clayton.

copkiller-orlando-manhunt

Officers and deputies focused their manhunt on an apartment complex in northwest Orlando, and dozens of residences had been searched. Residents who were evacuated from their homes sat on a sidewalk along a street with heavily armed officers and deputies and a parked SWAT team truck.

Clayton, 42, was killed outside a Wal-Mart store in northwest Orlando early Monday, and Orange County Sheriff’s Office Deputy First Class Norman Lewis was killed in a crash while responding to a manhunt for Loyd.

Another Orlando police officer was involved in a crash while responding to the shooting but had only minor injuries.

Authorities said Loyd previously was a suspect in the murder of his pregnant ex-girlfriend in December.

“He should be considered armed and dangerous,” Police Chief John Mina said at a morning press conference. Later in the day, the chief said, “It doesn’t matter where he is. We will track him down to the ends of the Earth.”

Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings said deputies had been searching unsuccessfully for Loyd for several weeks and believe he was receiving help from someone.

At an afternoon news conference, Demings urged Loyd to turn himself in peacefully.

“If we have to go in after him, then that jeopardizes and puts at risk the safety of law enforcement officers … and we cannot control what happens in that situation,” Demings said.

Mina lauded Clayton, a 17-year veteran of the force as a “committed” officer and “a hero” who gave her life to the community she loves. The Orlando Police Department said in a tweet that Clayton always had a smile and a high five for every child she came across.

Clayton had grown up in the Orlando area and was active in programs that mentored young people, Mina said.

“She was always the first to step up and help kids,” the chief said.

Clayton was a supervisor for a patrol division in the neighborhood where she was shot, and she previously had worked in investigations and as a school resource officer, Deputy Chief Orlando Rolon said.

“She made a point, even outside her working hours, to do things for youth and do things for the community,” Rolon said.

She was married and had a college-aged son. She died Monday at 7:40 a.m., less than an hour after she was shot while on duty.

Police released a video of Clayton’s body being taken out of the hospital to a waiting van in a flag-covered stretcher. A line of officers saluted as the stretcher was wheeled out.

Authorities said 17 area schools were placed in lockdown after the shooting.

The apartment complex that was the focus of the manhunt and shooting in northwest Orlando was nowhere near Orlando’s tourism corridor in the southern part of the metro area.

“There will be a large law enforcement presence in that area until we can determine he is not there,” Mina said.

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer declared a day of mourning in the city.

While at the Wal-Mart Monday morning, Clayton was tipped off by someone that Loyd was in the area. When she approached him, he fired multiple shots at Clayton, who was wearing body armor, Mina said.

Clayton returned fire but didn’t hit him, he said.

Sheriff’s officials said a deputy spotted Loyd fleeing in a vehicle. The suspect pulled into a nearby apartment complex and then fired at a deputy, striking the deputy’s SUV twice. The deputy wasn’t harmed, the sheriff’s office said.

Loyd then carjacked another vehicle, drove away and then abandoned the vehicle not far away, according to the sheriff’s office.

The manhunt was being conducted where he abandoned the vehicle.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office deputy was killed more than two hours after the shooting when a van collided with his motorcycle as he responded to the manhunt. Demings described the 35-year-old Lewis as “a gentle giant,” and the sheriff’s office said he had played football for the University of Central Florida before joining the agency 11 years ago.

Gov. Rick Scott canceled an appearance in Orlando because of the shooting but appeared with Orlando officials at the news conference.

“I’m heartbroken and angry,” Scott said.

Source: AP

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BREAKING – Five People Dead in Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting

DEVELOPING – Five people are dead and a shooting suspect is in custody Friday after a lone gunman opened fire at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Florida without saying a word, witnesses and authorities say.

At 2:30 p.m. local time, the TSA said there was another active shooter at the airport and that all terminals were closed. Law enforcement officials would not confirm it.

The suspect in custody was identified as Esteban Santiago, Florida Sen. Bill Nelson told reporters. He said Santiago was carrying a military ID, but did not elaborate.

Eight people were rushed to hospitals, the Broward County Sheriff said.

“It was very surreal,” John Schlicher, a witness, told Fox News. “He did not say a word.” He described the shooter as a slender man with dark hair, likely in his 30s, wearing a Star Wars T-shirt.

While speaking to Shepard Smith live on Fox News, Schlicher said he heard crews ordering passengers to take cover. He spoke over the phone while ducked down on the floor.

“He was shooting people that were down on the ground, too,” Schlicher said.

The gunman apparently got down on the ground and waited for police to arrive after he ran out of bullets, a witness told CBS News.

The office of Florida Gov. Rick Scott said state law enforcement have not confirmed a motive behind the shooting. Scott is traveling to the scene to be briefed by law enforcement.

The ATF was responding to the scene. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson was monitoring the shooting and getting regular updates — part of standard practice, a federal law enforcement source told Fox News.

The airport is the 21st busiest in the United States and serves 21 different airlines. Nearly 2.5 million people passed through the airport in November, according to a county government report.

Source: Fox News

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Charges Expected in Brutal Chicago Facebook Assault

Charges are expected against four people who police say beat a man in an assault that was broadcast live on Facebook, Chicago police said.

The victim is a suburban Chicago resident who Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said has “mental health challenges.”

In a news conference Wednesday, Johnson described the video as “sickening.”

chicago-facebook-assault-live

“It makes you wonder what would make individuals treat somebody like that,” he said.

The investigation began Monday after Capt. Steven Sasso said officers found a man who “was in distress and was in crisis” walking on a street on the city’s West Side. The man was taken to a hospital and it was later discovered that he had been reported missing from an unidentified suburb.

At about the same time, police took several people into custody at a nearby address where they found signs of a struggle and property damage. Investigators determined that the missing man had been at the same address.

Charges were expected to be filed within 24 hours, Cmdr. Kevin Duffin said Wednesday.

While police officials did not confirm the races of the suspects or victim, video from Chicago media outlets appeared to show someone off-camera using profanities about “white people” and President-elect Donald Trump. The victim appeared to be white, while others shown in the video appeared to be black.

A motive for the attack, racial or otherwise, has not been determined, police said.

When asked about the racial comments on the video, Duffin said the four in custody are “young adults and they make stupid decisions.” Investigators will have to determine whether the racial remarks were “sincere or just stupid ranting and raving” when considering a potential hate crime charge, Duffin said.

The victim was with his attackers for 24 to 48 hours before police found him, and the episode has left him shaken, according to Duffin.

“He’s traumatized by the incident and it’s very tough to communicate with him at this point,” he said.

The victim was a classmate of one of the attackers and initially went with that person voluntarily, Duffin said.

Police haven’t identified the individuals in custody, but said three are Chicago residents and one is from suburban Carpentersville.

Source: AP